Lamborghini Murciélago: a smart or stupid supercar buy?

Now I’m a massive fan of Lamborghini‘s mainly because they have historically been nuts and controversial.

As a young lad, the posters that adorned my wall where the Lamborghini Diablo (nuts), Ferrari Testarossa (Miami Vice of course) and the Porsche 959 (fastest car in the world at the time).

For me the Lamborghini Gallardo is not nuts enough and was a commercial decision, not one of the heart like many of the past Lamborghini’s. The Lamborghini Murciélago is definitely more me.

It’s difficult to be mature or adult around the Lamborghini Murciélago. It’s a loud, raucous, in your face type of car, although for me not as much so as the V12’s that came before it (Diablo, Countach, Muira et al.).  The noise can leave your ears ringing for hours after.  Cool.

If you look around you may be able to buy a Lamborghini Murciélago for as little at £75,000.  Now that’s a lot of car for the money and well worth considering.

Why should you consider buying one?

  • There will never be another Lamborghini like it. With the Aventador now only offered with an ISR (Independent Shifting Rod) automated manual gearbox, the Murciélago assumes the favourable position of being the last manual V12 Lamborghini with its engine amidships. With a lineage that stretches back to the Miura and also includes the Diablo and Countach, it’s in great company.
  • The Murciélago represents arguably the finest ensemble of Lamborghini lunacy and Audi restraint, being launched three years after Ingolstadt’s takeover in 1998. So whilst the clutch no longer required the quads of an Olympic power lifter to depress, that gargantuan V12 still filled the compromised Murcielago cabin with noise and vibrations.
  • Value for money. £75,000+.  That’s a lot of car for the money.
  • Only 4,099 cars were made, so it’s relatively rare.
  • 0 – 60 mph (100 km/h) in 3.5 seconds.  What other cars that look and sound this good can you get for this price?
  • It’s probably reached the bottom of its price drop and likely to now only appreciate.

Why should you not consider buying one?

  • The bills could be big, but that all depends how you drive it.  Having spoken to several owners, there are no horror stories that I have yet to come across.  Personally I’d allow a worst case scenario budget of £3000-5000 per annum for servicing and upkeep.
  • You’ll probably need to build a bigger garage.  It’s a big car.

What are your thoughts?  Do you think is would be a smart or stupid buy?  If you own one, we’d love to hear your feedback on the pro’s and con’s.

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